New Rule to Require Back Up Cameras in All Vehicles by 2014

Named after a 2-year-old boy who was accidentally run over by his father while backing out of the family drive way in 2002, the Cameron Gulbransen Kids Transportation Safety Act was passed by Congress in 2008. The legislation tasked the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) with establishing rear visibility standards, and now the administration is bringing forth its final rule.

The rule will require automobile manufacturers to equip all new passenger vehicles with rearview cameras by 2014.

Speaking about the installation of rearview cameras, Clarence Ditlow, executive director of the Center for Auto Safety in Washington, was quoted by the New York Times as saying: "We haven't done anything else to protect pedestrians. This one thing we can do and should do."

While the NHTSA estimates that the annual cost of the new rule would be between $1.9 and $2.7 billion annually - or approximately $160 to $200 per vehicle - the NHTSA foresees the technology saving approximately 292 lives and preventing nearly 18,000 injuries per year.

The New York Times reports that rearview cameras come standard on 45 percent of 2012 model year vehicles.

Government statistics cited by the New York Times show that backover car accidents fatally injure over 225 people per year, approximately 44 percent of whom are under the age of 5. Further, KidsAndCars.org reports that during an average week two children are killed and another 50 kids are injured in these accidents.

Because many young children are injured, these accidents are devastating. If you or a loved one has been injured by a driver moving in reverse, speak with an experienced personal injury attorney.