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Would this help reduce medical malpractice doctor errors?

A resident of a southern university medical school recently published an article that may be of interest to Iowa doctors and medical patients alike. She wrote that perhaps more upfront discussions regarding mishaps may help reduce possible medical malpractice doctor errors down the line. The general surgery resident claims the difference between bad doctors and good doctors is that bad ones refuse to admit their mistakes.

The article suggests a silent solidarity exists among medical professionals that helps conceal error.  It goes on to say that freely admitting when a mistake is made may help colleagues learn from a particular experience so as not to repeat it in the future. The belief is that by allowing oneself to be vulnerable (to criticism and perhaps reprimand) the overall quality of medical care throughout the nation would likely improve if more doctors would come forward to admit their errors.

When someone entrusts his or her treatment to medical professionals, he or she has the right to reasonably assume that all protocol and accepted safety standards will be met in order to provide the highest quality care possible. Substandard care and negligence results in catastrophic (or fatal) injuries. When such tragedies occur, patients who survive their injuries may be left permanently disabled.

Who should be responsible for the expenses associated injuries caused by medical malpractice doctor errors? Many Iowa medical patients pursue justice in such situations by filing personal injury claims in civil court. Whether openness among physicians regarding discussions about mistakes would help lower the number of medical malpractice situations in the nation is debatable; however, anyone who has suffered because of a medical mistake may seek recovery for his or her losses by contacting a personal injury attorney.

Source: statnews.com, "Physicians need to openly discuss medical mistakes and near misses", Sara Scarlet, July 14, 2017

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